Completion of the dress, back organza layer done
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Sewing the LED light into the skirt, via stitchingIMG_5195

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Close up of Arduino LilypadIMG_5204

Testing the effect when lit up
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Movement 

I had to combine solo with Tiffany create a cohesive piece, which initially I could not see the concept of virtual touch in our performance. However, when Angeline came in to do the dance with us but in her own way, I could see the telematic connection and that was very interesting.

Continuation of dress-making

So far I had the shape of the dress along with the mesh and collar. The next steps were to add decorations to enhance the design of the dress.

Boiling of extra organza, there was insufficient
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To achieve an ombre effect on the skirt, I used this spray paint

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After spray painting the dress

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Starting to sew the organza under layer IMG_4800 IMG_4802

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Finished the organza under-layer for the front of the skirtIMG_4805

 

Movement session with Angeline

I consulted Angeline and she took the moves I was doing subconsciously, spurring me to develop them into intentional dance moves. I thought that was interesting, a depart from the usual dance I do which follows a fixed choreography. She was more interested in the spontaneity and the subconscious moves, it felt more like abstract art.

 

Dress adjusted and altered to be more tightly fit

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Scrunching the silver organza together for shape to prepare for boiling

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After boiling the fabric, releasing the foil

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Finished product

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Working on the electronics, programming the force resistor and LED light
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Sewing the neckline, pinning the shape

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Ironing down the interface for neckline

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Completed sweetheart neckline for dress
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Pinning the mesh to the dress

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Sewing the mesh into the dress

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Dress adjusted and altered to be more tightly fit

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Scrunching the silver organza together for shape to prepare for boiling

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After boiling the fabric, releasing the foil

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Finished product

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Working on the electronics, programming the force resistor and LED light
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Sewing the neckline, pinning the shape

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Ironing down the interface for neckline

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Completed sweetheart neckline for dress
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Pinning the mesh to the dress

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Sewing the mesh into the dress

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Project Update 1

Initial stage of laying out of the fabric

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Sketching and planning out of the draft

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Cutting the fabric

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Process of the front of the dress sewed

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Testing the fit

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Sewing the dressIMG_4472

Figuring out the back part of the dress
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Dress shape completed (back view)

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Dress shape completed (front view)
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Dress in progress: Still needs to poof the skirt, make the underlying tulle.

Concept

‘Futuristic Fantasy’ was the underlying idea behind my narrative, thus the aesthetic I was for my look was futuristic, edgy yet at the same time elegant and delicate. This is to convey the fantastical beauty in the technology, the wonderment in the third space. To add on to the fantastical look, I might use embellishments. I designed two different pieces, with some experimental preliminary sketches included. Most of my colors consist of black/grey/white as I was going for the high-tech look(though color palette is not confirmed). Regarding texture, I want the contrast as well – soft chiffon/organza ruffles alongside the smooth and crisp.

References 

For inspiration, I looked at futuristic fashion. These were the pieces that striked out to me:
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Anouk Wipprecht’s Smoke Dress – I was intrigued by the high-tech yet elegant look.

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Chomat’s Boning Dress – The architectural and geometric element in the design inspired me.

Designs 

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Design 1

The main highlight for this piece would be the boning structure, which I plan to use boning as the material. Its rigidity and geometrical structure purposefully contrasts with the soft and flowy costume underneath.

I plan to use comfortable fabric for the top, preferably cotton or lycra. For the skirt, I plan to use grey, slightly shimmery organza. In terms of wearables, the boning structure has many possibilities. It could expand via sensors, or perhaps LED lights used to light it up.

However, its rigidity might be challenging due to movement from dance. A possible solution would be to make the piece malleable, or structure it in a way that the arms will not be impeded during the performance.

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Design 2

Once again the clean structure will be used to contrast with the delicate ruffle skirt. The ruffle skirt can be expand via sensors, and the look can be achieved by the boiling of fabric. The color of the dress could be an ombre from white to grey, and the material more stiff. Once again, boning can be used as the shoulder pads to add the edgy, futuristic look.

Other sketches

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‘Intimacy White’ (2009) by Daan Roosegaarde, V2_Lab and Maartje Dijkstra. An example of smart textile

 

Wearable Kinesthetic Systems, Alessandro Tognetti, Federico Lorussi, Mario Tesconi, Raphael Bartalesi, Giuseppe Zupone, Danilo De Rossi (2005)

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Example of a health sensing garment developed by Athos

Sensing garments monitor the movement of the muscles and posture of the body. Human movement is analysed with anatomic segments like electromagnetic sensors. However, conventional sensors in wearable sensing systems are often rigid and uncomfortable, obstructive due to the requirement of mechanical plug. Thus, newer systems like Upper Limb Kinesthetic Garment (ULKG) and the Sensing Glove are developed to improve these drawbacks.

Both utilise Conductive Elastomer (CE) sensors which is made by combining silicon rubber and graphite, then spread across an elastic fabric substrate (Lycra) that is capable of customising shape and dimension for sensors. Metallic wires can be avoided in which are uncomfortable and inconvenient.

For example, ULKG detects posture of the various components of the arm. With around 20 sensors spread across the shirt, information is obtained regarding the joints of the arm. This is beneficial for patients to perform rehabilitation in unmonitored environments, where the physician is not present. Error by the sensors are often almost negligible.

The main advantage gained with this new technology is enabling people to wear for longer periods without discomfort, less obtrusive devices in the garments and accurate performance via the trial tests.

Wearable Electronics and Smart Textiles: A Critical Review, Matteo Stoppa and Alessandro Chiolerio (2014)

Smart Textiles are created with the integration of textiles and electronics, with the electronics being interwoven with the fabric.

There are 3 different types of smart textiles and the materials used also differ between each group of smart textiles.

1. Passive smart textiles: purely sensory, only able to sense environment and the user

Makes use of fabric sensors, e.g. thermocouples for temperature sensing and electromyography (EMG) sensors for tracking muscle activity. Also makes use of actuators which reacts to a signal given by a central control unit. Both are crucial to development of passive smart textiles.

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Example of Electromyography (EMG) sensor used to track muscle activity.

2. Active smart textiles: sense and react to environment

Combines both an actuator and sensing device. Requires power to function, in which could be generated through piezoelectric systems. Categorised into 2 active systems: input devices and display devices. Input devices might include shape-sensitive fabrics that is able to track manipulation to fabric like stretching, flexing. Display devices might include electroluminescent yarns that emit light for aesthetic visuals.

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Electroluminescent yarn used in Algae Lyrae collection (2008) by Vega Zaishi Wan

3. Very smart textiles: sense, react and adapt behaviour according to differing situations

Smart materials are being integrated into fabric via varying technologies. Examples of technology include embroidery or knitting. Combination of various source materials results in wide array of possible textiles. Early attempts are made for the textile itself to be used for electronic function for higher comfort.

Smart Textiles are being further developed for various fields like medical and sport. Research is being done for sensors and interactive elements to be incorporated into the clothing.