Y1S2 | Experimental Interaction | Final Project | Bellwire

 

 

Animation of the screenplay (Welcome screen): 

 

Animation of the screenplay (Stopwatch screen): 

 

Animation of the screenplay (Ending Screen): 

 

Bellwire in Situ: 

 

In-class Final Presentation Pt. 1

 

In-class Final Presentation Pt. 2:

 

In-class Final Presentation Pt. 3: 

 

View my Project Development Drawings here:

Y1S2 | Experimental Interaction | Final Project | Project Development Drawing

View my Project Body Storming here:

Y1S2 | Experimental Interaction | Final Project | Project Development Body Storming

 

Main references:

Make a Buzz Wire Game With an Arduino

https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/connecting-arduino-to-processing/all

The Merits and Demerits of Grading on a Bell Curve
Glitch tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfHN2GSkAP8

Stopwatch tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wd9o62x_6pY&t=209s

Line animation tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYWGWATVWVI

 

Y1S2 | Experimental Interaction | Research Critique 4 | Uncomfortable Interactions

UNCOMFORTABLE INTERACTIONS

Introduction

Before I start on my topic Desert Rain which I was being tasked, I will talk about what uncomfortable interactions are. From the article “Uncomfortable Interactions”, I was basically being taught on the idea of what uncomfortable interactions literally is- the benefits, the forms, as well as the tactics.

Through this knowledge, I was fully equipped to understand the reason behind Desert Rain. This article aided me really well in understanding the whole context and purpose behind Desert Rain, and also why the creators even designed it in the first place. Bear with me for the brief yet long summary of the main pointers I sieved out from the article. It is really beneficial to understand the background so that we can see the bigger picture, on how Desert Rain was composed through uncomfortable interactions.

 

What is uncomfortable Interaction?

Uncomfortable interactions are those that cause a degree of suffering to the user. This may be physical suffering such as physical stress, tiredness or pain, but might also involve mental suffering due to fear and anxiety, either experienced directly or empathically on behalf of others.

This is not to say that the overall aim of such experiences is to create discomfort, but rather that uncomfortable interactions may be a useful ‘means to an end’ – a way of promoting certain other benefits, values or worth as we now discuss.

 

What are the potential benefits of uncomfortable interactions?

Many of us have a fundamental need for stimulation, arousal, and excitement. As such, this has fuelled the development of extreme forms of entertainment for many years. In our everyday lives, we are increasingly removed from the direct experience of violence and related suffering. Through uncomfortable interactions, we can then enhance entertainment in several ways.

There are mainly three benefits for uncomfortable interactions:

  1. Entertainment
  2. Enlightenment
  3. Sociality

Entertainment

Firstly, physical discomfort may be an important part of thrill. For example, rollercoasters involve extreme accelerations, sudden drops and inversions. In such cases, feelings of thrill may arise from a combination of fearful anticipation, followed by an extreme physical sensation, and then the euphoria of relief at having survived. Such experiences demonstrate a complex relationship between pleasure and suffering that, if carefully designed, may stimulate powerful emotions.

Discomfort may naturally tend to focus the participant’s attention inwards onto their own feelings, increasing the subjective intensity and memorability of the experience. Hence, entertainment actually relies on a sensations as well, rather than just pleasure alone.

Enlightenment

Human suffering is a powerful and recurring theme among interactive art works. Uncomfortable interactions may help establish an appropriate tone for engaging with dark themes, demanding a deep personal commitment, and in turn, promoting empathy and respect. Also, interactive artworks tend to provoke interpretation rather than directly giving information. Experiences involving discomfort naturally establish an ambiguous and provocative relationship with their participants: is this meant to be a pleasurable or painful experience?

Widening our perspective, there are important areas of human endeavour in which suffering is related to personal enlightenment, including religious and spiritual practices such as abstinence, fasting, ascetism and mortification of the flesh. Discomfort can be an important factor in self-expression, from the extreme postures and movements in some dance and sports in which the body is seen to be stretched to its limits, through to self-expression through body art such as tattoos and piercings.

Sociality

Confronting and sharing discomfort may be a powerful social experience. Initiation rituals that involve enduring social or even physical discomfort are to be found in many settings and cultures. Social bonding around discomfort extends to audiences witnessing the public discomfort of others. For example, team development activities in which groups must work together on unusual tasks, which is a challenging physical nature.

 

What forms can such interactions take?

 Such interactions are able to take up in 2 forms:

  1. Traditional performing arts
  2. Human–computer interaction (HCI)

Traditional performing arts

The performing arts have always contained elements of discomfort due to their origin in ritual which often included sacrifice. Here are examples to elaborate:]

1.1 .     Stelarc Suspension (2012)

A series of performances in which audience members observe his suspended body being moved and controlled by machinery, and in one case remotely controlled his body via electric stimuli

1.2 .     Abramović and Ulay’s, Imponderabilia (1977)

Audience had to enter the gallery by pushing through the narrow space created by the naked bodies of the two performers who stood against opposing walls facing each other 

1.3 .     Marina Abramović’s Rhythm O (1974)

A six-hour performance in which the audience was encouraged to use a series of objects on Abramović’s body that included a gun, a bullet, a pocket knife, an axe, and matches.

Human–computer interaction (HCI)

In its recent turn to the arts and entertainment, HCI has broadened its focus to cover aesthetic and emotional design values associated with the ‘user experience’. Here are examples to elaborate:

2.1.     Desert Rain (1997)

This HCI involved militaristic briefings, participants being lost in a virtual world, and then having to decide whether to leave a colleague behind.

2.2.     Uncle Roy All Around You (2003)

This HCI led participants to be lost and alone in a city and then required them to take apparently risky decisions such as getting into a strange car as part of an engagement with the themes of trust and surveillance.

2.3.     The Meatbook (2007)

This HCI was an interactive artwork that required users to touch and manipulate rotting raw meat.

 

What tactics can be used to create discomfort?

There are a few main tactics to create discomfort. We can group them under the 4 principle forms of uncomfortable interactions:

  1. Visceral discomfort
  2. Cultural discomfort
  3. Discomfort through control
  4. Discomfort through intimacy

Visceral discomfort

Visceral refers to those aspects that most directly relate to physical sensation, from the unpleasant feel of materials, to demanding stressful or strenuous movements, to causing pain.

1.1 .     Design unpleasant wearables and tangibles

1.2.      Encourage strenuous physicality

1.3.      Cause pain

Cultural discomfort

Cultural discomfort refers to creating interactions that invoke dark cultural associations.

2.1.      Confronting challenging themes and difficult decisions

Confronting participants with difficult decisions involving culturally challenging issues. More generally, the cultural acceptability of material that is considered adult, difficult or vulgar provides a significant for discomfort.

2.2 .     Design culturally resonant devices

Cultural associations extend beyond the content of the experience to the form of the interface itself, including to the design of devices.

Discomfort through control

Participants may become uncomfortable when giving up control, or indeed assuming an unusual degree of control.

3.1.      Surrender control to the machine

Surrendering control emphasises the frustration inherent in unpredictable control and surprising system responses, while the reverse approach of overly precise control may also create discomfort through extreme compliance.

3.2.      Surrender control to other people

Theatrical performances typically involve surrendering control to the performers, which may engender uncomfortable feelings of helplessness, disempowerment, or more neutrally a lack of responsibility.

3.3 .     Require participants to take greater control

There is discomfort to be found in assuming greater control of others as this may invoke feelings of power, responsibility, capriciousness or mischief.

Discomfort through intimacy

Intimacy is a tricky business, and offers plenty of scope for engineering discomfort by distorting the social norms around which it is negotiated.

4.1.      Isolate people

Denying the comfort of intimacy through isolating people from the social support of friends and family, leaving them alone in an unfamiliar environment is not only disturbing, but it also naturally focuses participants inwardly on their own feelings.

4.2.      Establish intimacy with strangers

At the other extreme, intimate encounters with strangers such as performers can be very uncomfortable.

4.3.      Employ surveillance and voyeurism

One approach is to emphasise the sense of vulnerability inherent in being surveilled, especially by unseen observers. There is also discomfort to be found in watching others. This may become especially uncomfortable when the voyeur is aware they may also being watched.

These tactics are only applied at particular moments during each experience. We need to remember that discomfort is not the overall goal, but rather a momentary point on a journey.

 

How does uncomfortable interaction experiences work?

The Renaissance saw the development of the classic five-act performance structure consisting of:

  1. Exposition
  2. Rising action
  3. Climax
  4. Falling action
  5. Dénouement

Exposition

It is the initial framing of the experience (marketing, briefings and queuing) and how this sets up an uncomfortable anticipation from the very outset.

Rising Action

It is the anticipation of discomfort increases as the experience proper begins and suspense gradually builds.

Climax

This marks a climactic moment of a particular discomfort in which anticipation turns into actual experience. Two important principles guide the design of this climactic moment. First, it must be transitory, both in terms of being relatively brief compared to the duration of exposition and rising action, but also in that its effects soon pass.

Falling action

Following the experience of discomfort naturally comes a moment of release or catharsis. This may be associated with feelings of intense pleasure, even euphoria.

Dénouement

Finally, is the critical importance of reflection afterwards which provides opportunities to assimilate the experience of discomfort, share it with others through storytelling, further deepen any new insights, or simply to enjoy the bragging rights of having passed through a rite of passage.

We argue that it is especially important (but often neglected) to design in explicit moments of reflection such as opportunities to meet other participants or acquire documentations such as souvenirs, photos and videos. This is especially true in experiences that make extensive use of isolation, as participants will have had little opportunity to discuss a possibly highly subjective experience with others. Tactics of control and intimacy may be especially applicable here as experienced participants will be in a position to control others and may be able to reflect through doing so.

We note that while discomfort may rise, peak and fall according to this dramatic structure, various forms of discomfort can be experienced throughout and some tactics may be more relevant to particular ‘acts’ that others. Moreover, experiences will often involve multiple peaks in which participants experience successive discomforts, for example successive dilemmas, encounters, physical shocks and so forth.

I have come to the end of introducing what uncomfortable interactions is. Next up, I would be talking about how Desert Rain incorporated uncomfortable interactions into their interactive installation.

 

DESERT RAIN

What is Desert Rain?

Please refer to my slideshow below for my presentation in class regarding Desert Rain. It would be essential to see through the slides first, before I explain the relevance between Desert Rain and uncomfortable interactions below.

This is the link to my presentation slides:

DN1010 Experimental Interaction _ Presentation _ Desert Rain

This is the link for the video URL:

 

How does  Desert Rain relate contextually to what I have learnt on uncomfortable interactions?

After reading up on both Desert Rain and uncomfortable interactions, I then realised that we have all experienced this at some point in time in our lives. Never would I have thought that those experiences were counted as uncomfortable. It was so intriguing, after I realised that it subconsciously affects our inner feelings and thinking without us knowing.

Every time we try out and experience new things, we always look forward to a good experience to remember. That being said, why do we still want to take roller coasters, go to Halloween parties, or even watch a horror movie? This is how uncomfortable interactions come into place. Although we know of the consequences that we would face at the end, presumably scary/anxious/uncomfortable, we would still feel that it is a relatively “good” interaction to experience.

 

What form of interaction did Desert Rain take?

In Desert Rain, Blast Theory used HCI for the whole experience. From my presentation slides, we could tell that the HCI in Desert Rain covered aesthetic and emotional design values associated with the ‘user experience’.

 

What benefits were used through uncomfortable interactions in Desert Rain?

Desert Rain made use of all the three benefits of uncomfortable interactions:

Entertainment

As many of us have a fundamental need for stimulation, arousal and excitement, this has fuelled the need of thrill through entertainment. Hence, there were many parts of thrill in this whole interactive installation. One example would be the dark ante-chamber the participants were being led to which they had to leave their coats and put on hooded black jackets. Feelings of thrill would arise from them having a sense of foreboding as they were all stripped to equal identities, not knowing what will happen next. As mentioned above, this feeling of discomfort may naturally tend to focus the participant’s attention inwards onto their own feelings, increasing the subjective intensity and memorability of the experience.

Enlightenment

As explained above, human suffering is a powerful and recurring theme among interactive art works, be it physically or mentally. The participants were led to U-shaped cubicles where they enter the virtual world of war, where they immerse themselves into the game. The intensive setting in the game would allow them to experience and engage with real life identities during the war, demanding a deep personal commitment, and in turn, promoting empathy and respect. This feeling of discomfort naturally establish an ambiguous and provocative relationship with their participants, combining both pleasure and pain in the overall experience.

Sociality

Sociality comes in when the participants went alone a sand corridor to a reconstructed motel room where they were confronted with the real identities and experience of their targets during the game. They were then taught on the real-life stories of their own targets during the times of war. As such, being confronted and the sharing of discomfort between them may be a powerful social experience.

 

What tactics did Desert Rain use to create discomfort?

Desert Rain also made use of the four principle tactics to create discomfort:

Visceral Discomfort

As visceral discomfort is described through designing tangibles, visceral discomfort would be felt when the participants stepped through the rain curtain after the game ends.

Cultural discomfort

Cultural discomfort refers to creating interactions that invoke dark cultural associations. This discomfort kicks in when the participants were led to the reconstructed motel room where they were confronted with the real identities and experience of their targets during the game.

Discomfort through control

Participants may become uncomfortable when giving up control, or indeed assuming an unusual degree of control. This was being implemented right at the start of the whole experience, where the participants were told to put on hooded jackets, stripping them of their identities, giving everyone equal exact likeness.

Discomfort through intimacy

One form of discomfort through intimacy would be to isolate people. The participants were all being isolated when they were led to the U-shaped cubicles where they start to play the game in the virtual world. Denying the comfort of intimacy through isolating people from the social support of friends and family, leaving them alone in an unfamiliar environment is not only disturbing, but it also naturally focuses participants inwardly on their own feelings.

These tactics are only applied at particular moments during each experience as you could see from my examples. Each experience only made use of one tactic. This is because creating discomfort is not the overall goal, but rather a momentary point on a journey.

 

How does uncomfortable interaction experiences work in Desert Rain? 

Yet again, Desert Rain made use of all the development of the classic five-act performance structure.

  1. Exposition: Briefings and instructions done at the start of the whole interactive installation, inside the dark ante-chamber.

 

  1. Rising Action: Participants were led to the U-shaped cubicles where they start to play the game in the virtual world.

 

  1. Climax: Participants were given only 20min to capture their allocated targets in desert landscapes, bunkers and motels.

 

  1. Falling action: Participants were led along a sand corridor to a reconstructed motel room

 

  1. Dénouement: Participants were confronted with the real identities and experiences of their targets.

While discomfort may rise, peak and fall according to this dramatic structure, various forms of discomfort can be experienced throughout and some tactics may be more relevant to particular ‘acts’ than others. Moreover, experiences will often involve multiple peaks in which participants experience successive discomforts, for example, successive dilemmas and encounters during the gameplay itself.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, I feel that inputting uncomfortable interactions in an installation is a very ingenious idea to allow participants to remember the experience wholeheartedly. Personally, I just challenged myself to remember the unforgettable experiences I had during my life for the past 22 years, and I realised that they were the ones which had uncomfortable interactions in them. One example would be my National Service days, where we experienced physical and mental stress. However, it was only through these uncomfortable interactions which made us think more, and grow more as a person, giving ourselves more enlightenment.

 

Therefore, uncomfortable interaction would be something that I would want to include in my future works, as I believe that it would be a deep impact on my audience.

 

Y1S2 | Experimental Interaction | Micro-Project 3 | Together Split

Introduction

For micro-project 3, my group was tasked to come up with a 1 to 3 minute collaborative performance that involves split-screen video chat features on social media, where each of us will create content for different segments of our screen.

It was not an easy task as we each had to go to different locations within ADM while filming this whole performance. As such, we had to plan and choreography our performance beforehand, such as the different gestures, movement, textures, objects, and camera angles despite being in different locations to create a third space.

 

Our Work

We chose Instagram Video Group Chat feature as it allows three of us to be connected into one screen. It took us quite some time to come up with an idea as we wanted something creative.

Since we decided to use Instagram, we wanted to create a story which links to this particular social media platform. Eventually, we thought of making use of Instagram’s Superzoom’s music, which can be found when recording a story on Instagram. The Superzoom is the most well-known function while recording stories, where each music lasts for roughly 5 seconds to 10 seconds.

Our story is about the friendship between a pair of hands, but the twist is that the owner had zero control over her own hands. The video would show the owner’s face (top) where facial expressions are being made, while the pair of hands (bottom left & right) are having massive disagreements with each other which led to a fight, but eventually gave in to each other and decided to make love and not war.

For the duration of this whole story, the pair of hands were the main actors where both hands were executing different gestures and movements, while the owner’s face’s expressions were to aid the ambiance and atmosphere of the whole story. In other words, the expressions by the owner’s face was to spice up the whole story.

For each exaggerated movement done by the pair of hands, we emphasized it by using the Instagram Superzoom music to show attention. One of my groupmates was the face of the owner (top), while my other groupmate and I was the pair of hands (bottom left & right).

We had to choreograph and practice multiple times before we could each head to different locations to film the third space, which was our biggest difficulty. Despite the difficulties we faced, we felt that it was a fun project to work on and we were satisfied with our final outcome. Our movements were synchronized and the music fits in perfectly with our storyline.

This is the video link of our work:

 

Conclusion

1. Which project did you feel you had the most creative control? Why?

From the least creative control to the most creative control: I’ll rate micro-project 1, followed by micro project 2, and finally micro-project 3.

In micro-project 1, we were tasked to take our phone or computer to a place at ADM that has special significance and photograph it, and post the photo on Instagram with #1010adm hashtag. Thereafter, we could then examine the creation of an alternative virtual space via our hashtag #1010adm.

As there was a restriction in this project where we could only photograph the space or area that is only inside ADM, I was obliged to only think of things within and related to ADM only. I wasn’t able to photograph things outside ADM where I was sure I had many more significant sites to express my work.

Furthermore, I consider this project as a static work. To me, a static work is something which is plain 2D as it is just a flat photograph. If we were allowed to do things such as installations or a short film, I would be able to play with time, which could greatly assist me in boosting my creativity.

In micro-project 2, it was a group task. We were tasked to create our own crowd-sourced artwork using any social media or online platforms. This project is very different from micro-project 1, as we had external audience that were able to alter and change our intentions of the project.

As much as my group and I wanted the project to go according to the plan that we designed, it would definitely not follow exactly the same because of the crowd that is partially warping the final outcome.

However, we had more inputs of putting our creative brains into this project as we are not restricted or limited to any platforms or rules, which allowed us to take on crowds that were not even our friends. The process of working with total  random strangers gave us unexpected results which taught us a lot in return.

In micro-project 3, it was also a group task. My group was tasked to come up with a 1 to 3 minute collaborative performance that involves split-screen video chat features on social media, where each of us will create content for different segments of our screen.

For this project, I felt that we had the most creative control over it because we could control the whole process to the outcome that we want. There was nothing in between to deter us from what we were doing. We were able to come out with our own storyline with no restrictions and follow through it exactly the same as we planned step-by-step.

As such, I felt that micro-project 3 was the project I felt I had the most creative control, while micro-project 1 was the project I had least creative control.

 

2. Which project had the most unpredictable outcome? Why?

Micro-project 2 had the most unpredicted outcome, while micro-project 3 had the most predicted outcome.

As mentioned above, micro-project 3 allowed my groupmates and I to plan the whole process as well as the result that we want in the end. We had total control over the whole project and there was nothing to stop us from achieving what we wanted.

From planning which platform to use, to the storyline, to the actions, everything was arranged in order which we then executed it swiftly and smoothly. Needless to say, the outcome was what we had expected it to be and thus, this project had the most predicted outcome.

In micro-project 2, we had to use crowd-source to achieve our final result. We planned out everything and executed it well. However, the results that we received was the total opposite of what I had expected it to be.

Refering back to the process we carried out, the responses we gathered from both online platforms were what I had expected. However, the major twist was that the responses didn’t match the group that I had expected it to be- I expected the responses from Instagram to be wild and truthful, while the responses on Omegle to be nonsensical and thrashy. But it was the total opposite.

A huge factor that explains this would be the involvement of a crowd. We could never predict what a crowd would react, or what they would present us with. We would not be able to read their minds or plan ahead of them. We could programme and make a strategy to make a crowd follow our rules, which narrows them from total freedom. However, there is always a limit to that as well, because there wouldn’t be two people of the same exact mindset in this world. Therefore, the outcome would definitely be different from what we would expect it to be.

Hence, Micro-project 2 had the most unpredicted outcome, while micro-project 3 had the most predicted outcome in my opinion.

 

3. Which project best illustrates the concepts of DIWO & Open–Source? Why?

I feel that micro-project 1 best illustrates open-source, while micro-project 2 best illustrates the concepts of DIWO.

“Open source is a collaborative concept based on peer production, sharing, revision, and peer review.” – Vaidhyanathan, Open Source as Culture, 2015.

In micro-project 1, it was the only project whereby we could view each other’s works, and interact with them at the same time. We had to upload our works onto Instagram with #1010adm hashtag, which we could then examine the creation of an alternative virtual space via our hashtag #1010adm. Through the alternative third space created by us, we were able to share our thoughts and comment on each other’s posts, which shows a collaborative concept via peer review.

On the other hand, for micro-project 2, it was the only project that we had the chance to do with with a crowd. As such, it was a project completed with the aid of others as well. Without the crowd-source, we wouldn’t have been able to achieve the end result.

Like what I had mentioned back in micro-project 1’s post, the meaning of DIWO to me means creating something together with others. Thus, micro-project 2 best illustrates the concept of  DIWO in my opinion.

In conclusion, these three micro-projects taught me a lot. Although it is termed as micro-projects, I felt that it was more of macro-learning for me. It would not have been possible to complete these three projects without researching hard on it beforehand. I had to get inspirations from different Artists as well as to fully understand the different concepts before we head on to the process of completing each project.

All in all, I’m grateful for these learning experiences as I strongly feel that I can adopt them for my future personal/group works, for them to reach greater heights.

Y1S2 | Experimental Interaction | Micro-Project 2 | Crowd-Sourced Art

Introduction

In Micro-Project 1, we were taught the idea of Do-It-With-Others (DIWO).

In Micro-Project 2, we applied the idea of DIWO.

As an artist myself, this is the first ever project that I have completed with others to create the final product, and the results turned out to be pretty interesting,

My group was told to create our own crowd-sourced artwork using any social media or online platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, Google Doc etc. Before starting, I did a few research to gain some inspirations. I chanced upon an artwork by Craig D. Giffen, which gained my attention. It’s called “Human Clock”.

Human Cock is actually a website named simply “Humanclock.com”, and it shows a photograph or video with the current time represented somewhere in it. The photo/video changes every minute, all 1,440 occurring minutes on Earth. Audiences from all around the world are able to submit images of the time and it will be shown on the website at that point in time.

Here are some examples which I had captured:

This crowd-sourced artwork was really something that I have not seen before. Giffen uses people from all around the world to help him keep his work of art alive. The people are not his friends, neither did he deliberately choose who he wanted to take part for in Human Clock.

Giffen’s concept inspired me, the concept of having strangers to collaborate and do the work of art with you. That was when I thought to my group- why not do something that involves audiences from all around the world instead of just our close group friends that we are familiar with?

After much discussion, we decided to use two online platforms for this micro-project.

Platform 1: Omegle

Platform 2: Instagram

Omegle is a free online chat website that allows users to socialize with others without the need to register. The service randomly pairs users in one-on-one chat sessions where they chat anonymously using the names “You” and “Stranger”.

Instagram… You already know what it is.

The title of our project is called:

What is your deepest, darkest secret?

 

1. What is the content of the work and who is creating it?

In this micro-project, we asked this question, “What is your deepest, darkest secret?” to both the people of Omegle, and the people of Instagram. And that question of “What is your deepest, darkest secret?”, was the content of the work.

In Instagram, we posted the question using the sticker function on our stories, it looked like this:

On Omegle, we multiple chat boxes and started asking people the question straightaway individually (Images would be shown later for the response section).

So, who is creating this work? it would be the people of Omegle and Instagram, together with us. We would be asking the questions to them, and they would be replying to us, which is a DIWO approach. The purpose of using two different platforms, was for us to see the difference in responses garnered from both Omegle and Instagram. Omegle would be from a totally random stranger, and Instagram would only be from our own friends which we are all familiar with.

 

2. Where does this work take place?

Like what I had mentioned above, this work took place online on social media platforms, which is Omegle and Instagram in this case. We gave absolute freedom to what they wanted to respond. We did not set any constraints, restrictions or rules. We simply asked, “What is your deepest, darkest secret?”

We foresee the outcome of the responses from the two platforms to be vastly different, and it did. However, there was a major twist to the result that we thought it would be. Before you see the screen captures that we took from Omegle and Instagram, try yourself to predict what kind of replies you would expect from the crowd.

Do you have your predicted answers in mind now?

Here are the replies we reaped from Omegle:

 

Next, these are the replies we gathered from Instagram:

Take a moment to see and re-read the responses from above again. Did you expect these replies from the crowd? Did it match your predicted answers? Or did you expect something else? Let’s get back to that later on.

As you can see, the responses from Instagram were tame, while the responses from Omegle are the exact opposite, which were much more wild.

Responses from Omegle include:

  • Telling us their deepest darkest secrets
  • Asking us back the question
  • Asked if we had similar secrets

Responses from Instagram include:

  • Nonsensical phrases
  • Inside jokes
  • Not answering at all

 

3. How does this work involve social interaction?

The exchange of information we had on these two social media online platforms were the social interactions involved.

Going back to what I was mentioning earlier, the responses we gathered from both online platforms were what I had expected. However, the major twist was that the responses didn’t match the group that I had expected it to be- I expected the responses from Instagram to be wild and truthful, while the responses on Omegle to be nonsensical and thrashy. But it was the total opposite!

I thought that only the closest friends would open up to us as were had known each other for so long, and that the trust is already there. As for strangers wise, they wouldn’t dare to share much as we had zero interactions before.

After much thought process, I came up with this hypothesis:

The degree of how open one can get, depends on the extent the person is hiding behind the screen.

What I felt was that strangers had nothing to lose. Since we don’t even know them in person and we couldn’t possibly meet each other in life, they were not scared of being judged. Hence, they were more willing to open up to us.

However, those on Instagram are our close friends, people that we know. Anything that they reveal might cause uneasiness and awkwardness between us in the future. It’s in human nature for one to naturally judge a person when he or she reveals something that you wouldn’t expect he or she to do. Our friends would have to be accountable and responsible for the things they reveal, which eventually ends up for them not willing/wanting to reveal their deepest darkest secrets.

 

4. How is your crowd-sourced project different from one that is created by a single artist/creator?

The main difference between our crowd-sourced project from one that is created by a single artist/creator, would be the fact that there was a big social interaction bring involved, rather than just a one-on-one interaction.

Without multiple responses, this work of art that my group has created wouldn’t have been possible. We wouldn’t be able to study the responses of different people through one-on-one interaction, and I definitely wouldn’t be able to come up with the hypothesis I stated earlier because there wouldn’t have been many pieces of evidence.

However, one might ask if the crowd would be able to change our intention of the whole project. The answer is yes they can, and they did. The images that we have shown on top are the ones that we successfully managed to have a conversation with them. For those that quit the chat after we asked the question, we didn’t manage to collect any responses from those people. These are the ones that alter our aim of this project, as they weren’t keen to reply and hence, we consider them as not participating in the project.

This was the reason why we had to create chatrooms after chatrooms to garner more answers and responses, rather than limit the number of interactions. The more interactions we managed to achieve, the more accurate the results we get, which makes this Work of Art more realistic and genuine.

In conclusion, this micro-project was an eye-opening experience for me as I had never done any forms of Art with a crowd. What was more interesting was the fact that my group and I didn’t expect the end result to be the total opposite of what we predicted it to be initially.

Y1S2 | Experimental Interaction | Micro-Project 1 | Creating the Third Space

1.  Why did you choose this space or object to photograph?

Whether or not you had taken this lift before, somehow or rather you would have walked past this space before. Not many people use this lift. The minority who chose to use this lift has a certain personality only a few could understand, and those few are the ones who use this lift. I am one of them. There are so many reasons on why one shouldn’t use this lift: it is for the handicapped, there are two proper lifts at the lobby, it is slow like- and the list goes on. But, we still use it. People whom I’ve met while taking this lift together seemed to be able to click with me instantly, probably because of the similar mindsets we possess and our indifferent attitude towards others, which is the certain personality I was referring to earlier. What mindsets you might ask? If you know, you know. Hope to see you at that space sometime soon, only if you belong there.

 

2. What are some of the characteristics of this alternative virtual space you had created collectively?

A visual without explanation could have endless meanings. Scrolling through #1010adm, there was nothing new or interesting if we were just talking about visual wise- how creative could one get when we are bounded by only the school compound? Classrooms, library, study tables, or a cozy corner somewhere in the school.

However, if the Artist decides to explain the meaning of the visual he or she created, we as the audience could then see the true colours behind the Work of Art. In this case, the Instagram captions are the ones that make the difference. After reading a few posts, I came to the conclusion that there is a form of solidarity and coherence amongst us ADMers. We might not express as much when we are interacting in real life, but through this virtual space, the sense of unity and unanimity brought all of us to our consensus as one. Something that one could never escape in ADM- working day and night, rushing and completing the projects given to us.

Its wild though- us in this generation, being able to communicate better only through the virtual life. Good or bad, at least there is a platform where we can finally form a virtual space to share thoughts where everyone appreciates each other.

 

3. Under what circumstance will this alternative virtual space change?

I felt that this alternative visual space has a lot of similarities to “Cut Piece” by Yoko Ono, the Work of Art that we were tasked to discuss during our first lesson in Experimental Interaction. This alternative virtual space acts like Yoko Ono’s clothes. We, the audience, are the one executing physical actions, which transforms the Work of Art. One might argue that Yoko Ono also played a part as well, which was her ignorance towards this whole process. By not reacting or doing anything, it allowed the audience to transform the Work of Art freely.

Similar but not so similar to this project of “Creating The Third Space”, we (my classmates & I), are the ones who changed the virtual space inside Instagram by taking photos and posting it up with our own personal captions. The only difference is that Instagram isn’t real- it doesn’t have feelings, and it would not be able to make any decisions as it is just an Artificial Intelligence (AI), if we were to compare it with Yoko Ono. Therefore, I can conclude that we are the only ones that played a part in changing this alternative virtual space inside Instagram. Without us, the virtual space stays the same, cold and empty.

 

4. How does this project relate to what we discussed in the lecture regarding co-creation, the concept of Do-It-Yourself (DIY), Do-It-With-Others (DIWO)?

My personal definition for the three main concepts comprising of co-creation, Do-It-Yourself (DIY), and Do-It-With-Others (DIWO), are:

Co-creation: Creating something yourself, together with the aid from others.

DIY: Creating something all by yourself.

DIWO: Creating something together with others.

Here is how I view this whole project of “Creating The Third Space” with regards to the three main concepts:

The notion of us going around ADM to photograph a space or object is DIY, because everything is done personally. From sourcing the location, to taking a photo, and then uploading it on Instagram are all done by our own physical actions.

The co-creation then starts here, when we write our own captions with #1010adm hashtag.

Lastly, the DIWO is the part when all of our photos are directed into one virtual space as one after tagging #1010adm in our own photos. In this virtual space, all forms of interactions happen- all of us are free to comment and like on each other’s photos.

This is when the virtual space starts to alter and mold itself according to all our actions, creating a new alternative virtual space there and then.