2D: Lines Greatest Influence (transferred notes from hard-copy journal)

(Transferred notes from Hard copy Journal)

I found most of my inspiration for this project from one of my favorite contemporary artists, James R.Eads, who was born in 1989, Los Angeles. He had his college education at Skidmore before rising in popularity on social media e.g. Tumblr and Instagram for his (Van Gogh – like) illustrations.

This is his webpage: James R.Eads Illustration

Alternatively, his tumblr: James R.Eads Tumblr

The most distinctive feature of his works is his “reductive” approach in line-making (and thus, images). He does this from a largely black background, and creates the illusion of an image with lighter outlines.

 

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This is my final product. As you can see, I have adopted his approach in making a number of my lines, usually in emotions that have a dark or intense personality e.g. anxious, exhausted. But there’s more to it than the approach of making the lines.

There is the element of “expansion” in his lines, an effect that creates both space and void. He does so by playing around with the size of his lines, the amount of white and black in each region and the direction of his lines. Although most of his work is done digitally, I am inspired to try them out via monoprinting and the more traditional/fundamental methods.

 

 

 

2D (BTS 02): The Blue Ink Girl’s 2 Favorite Contemporary Influences

James R.Eads James R.Eads uses the reductive approach to encapsulate his astronomical atmospheres. The Less is More style and the homage to Van Gogh resonates with me.

Line reference: Overlapping, Smooth, Varying thickness.

Matt Forsythe Matt Forsythe‘s technique is smudgy and thus smooth. Sensuality is usually presented in darker atmospheres and glowing effects from great balance of contrast here and there.

Line reference: Thin, Many, Pencil-like, Chiaroscuro.

 

2D (BTS 01): The Blue Ink Girl’s Research on Artists

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Madness in volume, passion and texture. Rolled in 1 swirl. Perfection. Have got to adopt this cliche but glorious Vincent Van Gogh technique.

Tawara Yusaka‘s works have always been intense. His goal is to contain energy in brushstrokes, which I do feel from his work. There is a variation of pressure, texture, lightness and spaces. But there’s also a focus. That’s how I want to work things out, be it in art or in life.

Koichi Yamamoto‘s fascinating liquid-like atmospheres. It really stimulates the mind with its soothing vibes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jackson Pollock‘s famous drip painting technique. There’s something about how the paint connects to each other, as if a system, that appeals to human brain. Maybe we like our talent for making logic linkages too much.

The reductive technique is notably visually attractive. Still Pollock in this piece.

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Organised chaos. Pollock.

Cai Guo Qiang‘s gunpowder painting might be too violent for me, but I do appreciate how an action/movement creates marvelous designs that are unique to the motion. Let’s try collecting different movements on paper and see which creates a pattern I would like to replicate in my monoprint pieces (since they’re much cleaner and consistent anyway).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simplicity and Clarity in form and structure is what I can appreciate in Franz Kline‘s work. It’s not so much about the meaning of his work, for he himself said that he preferred portraying emotion than images for one to tap into his/her associative memory. Sure, it may not be the most comprehensible picture, but It does make me feel. I want to be able to make another person feel when they look at my art, too.