Resin and Latex

The rules of resin casting are simple. Mix 3% of hardener into your resin (i.e. the hardener should be calculated to 3% of the weight of your resin), this can be measured with a scale.

If too much hardener goes into the resin, it may crack. This is sometimes done intentionally by artists. If you go way over 3%, it starts to smoke. Too little resin, and it might not harden. The quantity of hardener is key to producing a good result.

Afterwards, you can pour the resin into the mould. Items can be cast in the resin, but be warned that it tends to ‘cook’. One could also opt to poke out the bubbles with a needle to produce a cleaner finish.

When the resin is cured, we can pop the resin out of the mould, and it should retain a solid shape.

Applications:

Amazon.com: Live edge river dining table with turquoise glowing ...

Amazon.com: Handmade Botanical Resin Earrings, Real Flower ...

Block Letter Keychain- Initial Letter Keychain- Pressed Flowers ...

Wood and Resin Art Surfboards Contain the Swirling Ocean Within

Etch, Raster, and Bleach

ETCHING

Fibre etching is a technique used that makes prints by selectively eating at fibres. The solution burns off the fibre of the velvet and leaves only the translucent silk.

We used silk screens to screen out a pattern for the fibre etching solution.

However, to my dismay, the velvet that I used was actually synthetic, and would not separate no matter how long I ironed.

Applications:

Commonly seen on scarves.

Fiber etch with stencil 18

Shiny Objects — Fiber Etch Tutorial (aka Devoré or Burn-Out)

BLEACHING

This technique is rather straightforward. Bleach removes pigment from the cotton, and the imprint creates a pattern on a fabric. In class, we were provided with a spray bottle of bleach. By obscuring parts of the fabric (tying it up, folding it, or even shibori), we could create patterns based on the parts exposed to the sprayed bleach.

Applications:

BLEACH TIE DYE CREW NECK T-SHIRT – Dikotomy

DIY Shibori - Honestly WTF

RASTER

Rasterising is also another common technique that works by removing materials. We can do so by uploading designs to send to the laser cut machine. It then burns partially through the wood (or acrylic), creating an ink-like imprint of your design.

Applications:

Pololu - 2. Laser-engraved wood handgun case

Black Woman Afro Silhouette Wooden Laser Cut Earrings – For Us ...

3D GRACE WOODEN LASER CUT EARRING - MANOA MINI - Sitting Pretty ...

Final Project: Metamorphose Frog Skirt + Samples

THE INSPIRATION (MOODBOARD + RESEARCH)

The frog belongs to the carnivorous group of amphibians. It can dwell in both dry land and fresh water. They could also live under rocks and in trees. Some important characteristics of an adult frog is a stout body, protruding eyes, anteriorly-attached tongue, limbs folded underneath, and no tail (except in tailed frogs). The appearance of a frog changes as it experiences different stages of metamorphosis.

Frog skin

The skin of a frog is distinctly glandular. These glands secrete substances that range from distasteful to toxic. The frog’s skin is also varied in colour, usually to camouflage themselves with natural colours — dappled brown, grey, green. However, some frogs have vividly coloured skin with lucid patterns. These could be bright red, yellow or black. They are usually toxic, and this idea wards off predators.

the life cycle of a frog

The life cycle of a frog comprises of 3 phases — starting as an egg, progressing to a tadpole, then completing metamorphosis as an adult frog.

______

START OF CYCLE

 

As an embryo (egg), it is covered in layers of gelatinous substance. When several eggs are clumped together, they are collectively known as frogspawn. The jelly provides support and protection while allowing the passage of oxygen, carbon dioxide and ammonia.

DEVELOPMENT PHASE

The egg then metamorphoses into a tadpole, it typically has an oval body and possesses a long, vertically flattened tail. As a general rule, free-living larvae are fully aquatic, but at least one species has semiterrestrial tadpoles which live among wet rocks. Tadpoles are typically herbivorous, feeding mostly on algae, including diatoms filtered from the water through the gills.

END OF CYCLE

 

Finally, at the last stage of the life cycle, the frog takes the adult form that we are most familiar with. This process is sudden and rapid.

The most significant change that occurs during this phase is the development of the lungs. The gills also start to disappear from the gill pouch, the front legs become visible. Another transformation occurs with the lower jaw, changing into the big mandible of the carnivorous adult. The long, spiral gut of the tadpole becomes the typical short gut of a predator, it is no longer herbivorous.

The nervous system becomes adapted for hearing and stereoscopic vision, and for new methods of locomotion and feeding. The eyes are repositioned higher up on the head and the eyelids and associated glands are formed. The eardrum, middle ear, and inner ear are developed. The skin becomes thicker and tougher, the lateral line system is lost, and skin glands are developed.

The final stage is the disappearance of the tail, but this takes place rather later, the tissue being used to produce a spurt of growth in the limbs. Frogs are at their most vulnerable to predators when they are undergoing metamorphosis. At this time, the tail is being lost and locomotion by means of limbs is only just becoming established.

SAMPLES

Sample I — Chosen Sample

Printed cloth + Organza + Furry yarn + Facial Pads — Applique

More details about the process of creating this sample will go into the next section of this post, describing how I made the final product.

Applied on some bottles and containers

Sample II — Creating a sculptural translucent surface with tape and iridescent beads

Tape + Iridescent Beads

This material was created by simply arranging some tape and dipping them in iridescent beads and then rolling it up with more tape. Although this technique is very simple, I feel like it looks better than all the other samples I’ve tried to create. It was inspired by the membrane-like translucent skin of the younger permutations of the frog — eggs and tadpoles.

Applied to a living room as wall decor

Original image from Kaodim

Sample III — Creating a 3D Crevice with machine smocking

Cloth + Smocking in circular shape with semi-elastic thread — Smocking

I realised that it was possible to create a 3D crevice-like mound on a flat cloth just by smocking with a machine using a semi-elastic thread. This idea was inspired by the mounds found on the frogs skin. On some frogs, eggs and babies can rest in these mounds.

This idea was not chosen because it uses up a whole lot of cloth to fill a small area. I also could only do this once because of the amount of elastic thread I had.

applied on a sofa

original image from Masons Home Decor

Sample IV — Creating organic looking smocking

variation 1:

variation 2:

Smocking organza to look as organic as possible.

This idea was inspired by the wrinkles on the frogs skin. I also wanted to create this on a soft, translucent material to mimic the fluidity of the younger permutations of a frog.

Sample V — A microscopic view of the frog’s skin

Strips of cloth sewn together in a cell-like pattern.

This idea was inspired by a microscopic view of the pores on the skin of an adult frog. As we all understand, the skin of a frog is also a means for moist breathing — one of its most prominent characteristics.

Sample VI — Creating 3d textures on frog’s skin with applique

This idea did not end well. To create this, I cut holes in the green cloth and popped the organza through the holes. I tried to sew all of it together but it just fell apart in the end.

However, I do enjoy the pinned version of this sample a lot, because it is very evidently inspired by a frog (the skin and its eggs).

Applied as part of Architecture, can be integrated with vertical gardening.

ALL APPLICATIONS

THE MAKING OF

Pattern making — since there was no dress form and also considering I live alone, I made a pattern out of my own measurements.

Using facial pads to create fibrous patches — freehanded cell-like cut-outs.

I also put in patches patterned cloths (picked these patterns out because they are reminiscent of an adult frogs skin). Pinned all of them down and sewed them on with a machine.

Using an exacto knife, I distressed the inside of the sewing to reveal the layers underneath.

Ideally, I would have created the fray of the edges with some sandpaper. However, due to material constraints…

It was quite a manual process. But it was also pretty cathartic.

I also embedded some wooly yarn in pockets, just to add variety to the skirt. They are reminiscent of a frogs eggs that have yet to hatch.

After repeating this process with all the pieces, I then put together the skirt. I sewed them with the machine.

Initially, I decided to create an invisible seam with some of the green fabric. But it was too flimsy to hold the shape and kept flipping out. So I went in with some stitches again.

The finishing touch was some veins that I created with furry yarn, sewn over with a machine zig-zag stitch. I thought it would be more obvious that the translucent layer was meant to be a membrane with the veins embedded in it. Afterwards, I hemmed the bottom of the skirt and added a zipper.

THE FINAL PRODUCT

metamorphose frog skirt

The concept of this skirt is fairly simple. I was intrigued by the way a frog’s been gentle its entire life, but one day turns into a lean mean bug-eating machine. As when it was a tadpole and egg, it had swam around with its translucent skin and flexible bodies. One day it grows a jaw and limbs, the patterns on his skin become more visible and less membrane-like. The skirt describes this process of transformation. I chose the method of distress because it best described both versions of the frog. I also make a skirt out of this surface because the skirt is iconic of poise and effeminacy, and would bear the most effect from raggedy edges and fun patterns. The slit down the thigh is also symbolic of revelation, making the skirt more edgy that a normal circle skirt generally would be.

Research Proposal for Final Project — The Dissection of a Frog

About Frogs

The frog belongs to the carnivorous group of amphibians. It can dwell in both dry land and fresh water. They could also live under rocks and in trees. Some important characteristics of an adult frog is a stout body, protruding eyes, anteriorly-attached tongue, limbs folded underneath, and no tail (except in tailed frogs). The appearance of a frog changes as it experiences different stages of metamorphosis.

Frog skin

The skin of a frog is distinctly glandular. These glands secrete substances that range from distasteful to toxic. The frog’s skin is also varied in colour, usually to camouflage themselves with natural colours — dappled brown, grey, green. However, some frogs have vividly coloured skin with lucid patterns. These could be bright red, yellow or black. They are usually toxic, and this idea wards off predators.

the life cycle of a frog

The life cycle of a frog comprises of 3 phases — starting as an egg, progressing to a tadpole, then completing metamorphosis as an adult frog.

______

START OF CYCLE

 

As an embryo (egg), it is covered in layers of gelatinous substance. When several eggs are clumped together, they are collectively known as frogspawn. The jelly provides support and protection while allowing the passage of oxygen, carbon dioxide and ammonia.

DEVELOPMENT PHASE

The egg then metamorphoses into a tadpole, it typically has an oval body and possesses a long, vertically flattened tail. As a general rule, free-living larvae are fully aquatic, but at least one species has semiterrestrial tadpoles which live among wet rocks. Tadpoles are typically herbivorous, feeding mostly on algae, including diatoms filtered from the water through the gills.

END OF CYCLE

 

Finally, at the last stage of the life cycle, the frog takes the adult form that we are most familiar with. This process is sudden and rapid.

The most significant change that occurs during this phase is the development of the lungs. The gills also start to disappear from the gill pouch, the front legs become visible. Another transformation occurs with the lower jaw, changing into the big mandible of the carnivorous adult. The long, spiral gut of the tadpole becomes the typical short gut of a predator, it is no longer herbivorous.

The nervous system becomes adapted for hearing and stereoscopic vision, and for new methods of locomotion and feeding. The eyes are repositioned higher up on the head and the eyelids and associated glands are formed. The eardrum, middle ear, and inner ear are developed. The skin becomes thicker and tougher, the lateral line system is lost, and skin glands are developed.

The final stage is the disappearance of the tail, but this takes place rather later, the tissue being used to produce a spurt of growth in the limbs. Frogs are at their most vulnerable to predators when they are undergoing metamorphosis. At this time, the tail is being lost and locomotion by means of limbs is only just becoming established.

Thermochromic Inks

thermochromic inks

Thermochromic powder mixed with a base can create a heat-sensitive pattern on a textile. When heat is applied to the powder, it becomes transparent and reveals the colour of the base (if the base is transparent, the ink just ‘disappears’). It can be applied just like a normal print or painted on.

In class we were provided some silk screens and block prints to play with. We used some of the thermochromic pigments in pink, yellow and black, though the black ink did not work as well as the others.

Applications:

Heat Transfer

DRY TRANSFER

We can transfer an image onto a fabric by ironing a crayon-drawn image on a piece of baking paper. Since the baking paper is translucent, we are able to create a tessellated image or pattern by tracing over it.

The iron should be set to a significant hear (recommended the cotton setting), then it melts off the baking paper and transfers onto the cloth. The image can come off a few times if battered thick enough with crayon, the residue from the crayon could last a few rounds. The iron should round the paper slowly to yield the best results.

I scribbled some graphic drawing of people and traced over them with a crayon on the baking paper. I traced over it twice to create a pattern and then transferred it onto a cloth to create somewhat of a graphical pattern!

Applications:

Pick up some Crayola Fabric Crayons to create an adorable DIY Rainbow Art T-Shirt! The possibilities are endless.

Image result for fabric heat transfer

_____

 

WET TRANSFER

Wet transfer is similar to dry transfer in a sense that it is a transfer of ink from one surface onto a textile with heat. However, working with a wet medium, we generate more unexpected shapes and textures. They are more organic and allow better blends of ink.

For this method, we used wet inks painted on paper, covered it with a sheet of baking paper, placed it on the cloth (wet side faced down) and ironed it on. I layered the wet paints and also created one that was mixed with a dry transfer. The outcome had a live edge effect and created unique, dynamic patterns.

Applications:

This may be the coolest thing I've ever seen ... definitely the coolest use of gelatin EVER ... printmaking with leaves, printing ink, and a cookie sheet of gelatin. Who would of thought?

 

Knitting

KNitting

Knitting is a common hobby, mostly as an idle practice. It involves a repetitive motion of creating loops and knots in a series that ultimately forms a single piece. This motion is assisted by 2 rods where the piece is transferred at every change of direction. The pattern of the loops can be deliberate (purl stitch/knit stitch etc.) and alternate.

One can use unconventional materials to create knitted pieces. The pieces can also form unconventional shapes and even 3D forms. Here are some of my experimentation with raffia strings, cotton threads and conventional yarns.

Raffia

 

Cotton

 

Applications:

Image result for unconventional fabrics using thread

Image may contain: person, indoor and wall

every beginning & end of the day (2019)

I will be documenting the final product and process in this post. I will begin with the former.

Project Description

An interaction that explores the interstice between ourselves and an inanimate everyday object. Blinds act as a psychoneurotic anchor for humans, they act almost as book ends to which our consciousness opens and closes.

Concept

I wanted to create the sensation of a lapse in time. To do that, I digitally engineered the movements of blinds and lights that emit through the blinds in different shades of warm and white colour picks from actual images.

The following are some images that I referenced.

Schematics & Automation–

The setup involves both Arduino and Processing. The hardware – 3 distance sensors and 3 servo motors wired extensively to 1 arduino,  a computer and a projector.

A diagram of the wiring for the hardware. The servo motors are connected to the tilting mechanism of the blinds.

The following is the arduino code:

#include <Servo.h>
Servo myservo;
Servo myservo2;
Servo myservo1;

int trigPin1 = 6;
int echoPin1 = 7;

int trigPin2 = 8;
int echoPin2 = 9;

int trigPin3 = 10;
int echoPin3 = 11;

int count;
int count2;
int count1;

boolean kena=false;
boolean kena2=false;
boolean kena1=false;

void setup() {
Serial.begin (9600);

myservo.attach(5);
myservo2.attach(4);
myservo1.attach(3);

pinMode(trigPin1, OUTPUT);
pinMode(echoPin1, INPUT);

pinMode(trigPin2, OUTPUT);
pinMode(echoPin2, INPUT);

pinMode(trigPin3, OUTPUT);
pinMode(echoPin3, INPUT);
}

void loop(){

int duration1, distance1;
digitalWrite (trigPin1, HIGH);
delayMicroseconds (10);
digitalWrite (trigPin1, LOW);
duration1 = pulseIn (echoPin1, HIGH);
distance1 = (duration1/2) / 29.1;

int duration2, distance2;
digitalWrite (trigPin2, HIGH);
delayMicroseconds (10);
digitalWrite (trigPin2, LOW);
duration2 = pulseIn (echoPin2, HIGH);
distance2 = (duration2/2) / 29.1;

int duration3, distance3;
digitalWrite (trigPin3, HIGH);
delayMicroseconds (10);
digitalWrite (trigPin3, LOW);
duration3 = pulseIn (echoPin3, HIGH);
distance3 = (duration3/2) / 29.1;

if (distance1<150 && distance2>=150 && distance3>=150){
Serial.print(“1.jpg”);
};

if (distance2<150 && distance1>=150 && distance3>=150){
Serial.print(“2.jpg”);
};

if (distance3<150 && distance1>=150 && distance2>=150){
Serial.print(“3.jpg”);
};

if (distance1<150 && distance2<150 && distance3>=150){
Serial.print(“12.jpg”);
};

if (distance2<150 && distance3<150 && distance1>=150){
Serial.print(“23.jpg”);
};

if (distance1<150 && distance3<150 && distance2>=150){
Serial.print(“13.jpg”);
};

if (distance1<150 && distance2<150 && distance3<150){
Serial.print(“123.jpg”);
};

if (distance1>=150 && distance2>=150 && distance3>=150){
Serial.print(“0.jpg”);
};

if (distance1 < 150) { kena=true;}

if (kena==true){count++;};

if (count>0 && count<7) {
myservo1.write(110);};

if (count>=7 && count<9){
myservo1.write(90);};

if(count>=9 && count<15){
myservo1.write(70);};

if (count>=15){
myservo1.write(90);
count=0;
kena=false;
};

if (distance2 < 150) { kena2=true;}

if (kena2==true){count2++;};

if (count2>0 && count2<7) {
myservo2.write(70);};

if (count2>=7 && count2<9){
myservo2.write(90);};

if(count2>=9 && count2<15){
myservo2.write(110);};

if (count2>=15){
myservo2.write(90);
count2=0;
kena2=false;
};

if (distance3 < 150) { kena1=true; }

if (kena1==true){count1++;};

if (count1>0 && count1<7) {
myservo.write(70);};

if (count1>=7 && count1<9){
myservo.write(90);};

if(count1>=9 && count1<15){
myservo.write(110);};

if (count1>=15){
myservo.write(90);
count1=0;
kena1=false;
};

delay(100);
}

The servo motors are controlled directly from Arduino, triggered by the distance sensor that corresponds to it. I set my threshold at 1.5m, around the length of a human. To generate a visual in Processing, I used Serial.print to generate the name of the .jpg file. The following is the processing code:

import ddf.minim.*;

Minim minim;
AudioPlayer player;

import processing.serial.*;
Serial myPort;
String data=”” ;
int i = int(data);
PFont myFont;
PImage no;

void setup()
{
fullScreen(P2D);
background(0);
myPort = new Serial(this, Serial.list()[2], 9600);
myPort.bufferUntil(‘g’);

minim = new Minim(this);
player=minim.loadFile(“blind.mp3″);
delay(5000);}

void draw(){

background(0);
no = loadImage(data,”jpg”);
image(no, 0, 0, width, height);
println(data);

if (data.equals(“1.jpg” )|| data.equals(“123.jpg”)|| data.equals(“2.jpg”)|| data.equals(“3.jpg”)|| data.equals(“12.jpg”)|| data.equals(“23.jpg”)|| data.equals(“13.jpg”)){
player.play();
player.rewind();
}

}
void serialEvent(Serial myPort)
{
data=myPort.readStringUntil(‘g’);
}

‘data’ is what’s returned to the serial port of my Arduino.

Visuals

Possible outcomes in the form of images. During the actual demonstration, I slightly unfocused the projection image to replicate the natural phenomenon:

No presence

Left blind

Right blind

Middle blind

Left & Right blind (2 blinds return white)

Left & Middle blind

Right & Middle blind

All blinds on (return brighter)

Changes

There has been a drastic change in concept since my first pitch due to several accusations of similarities to works of other artists concerning blinds (though unintended).

The following are some links & images of the milestones in my process.

https://oss.adm.ntu.edu.sg/syeow002/category/18s2-dm2000-tut-g01/project-development-drawings-18s2-dm2000-tut-g01/

Body Storming Documentation for Blind and Chandeliers

https://oss.adm.ntu.edu.sg/syeow002/category/18s2-dm2000-tut-g01/project-development-body-storming-18s2-dm2000-tut-g01/

password: phototactic

https://oss.adm.ntu.edu.sg/syeow002/category/18s2-dm2000-tut-g01/mid-term-project-18s2-dm2000-tut-g01/

Personal Reflections

Ultimately, I am happy with this outcome. On many mornings and nights I am reminded of this piece, which is the reverse effect of working on this for a long period of time. There were many moments of catharsis and discovery that I experienced from the people who tested it out. It was unfortunate to hear 2 of my servo motors grind to a halt at the very last moment, yet there is a sort of surrealism in seeing the light being casted on the ground as participants walked past them. Perhaps it all worked out for the better.

Further Expansion

If not limited by material, I would love to extend the length of this piece and perhaps house it in a more ambient location. It is my desire to watch a long stretch of these blinds wave and light up as people walk past.

生产 Mass

Imperial Mass is a discursive glorification of factory culture. From a distanced view, this Han Fu maintains a proud and silky silhouette that carries both extremes of tapered and flare.

The finer detailing of the pleats and rounded collar are inspired by the muffin uniform of a factory worker.

Image result for chinese factory worker

– Business Insider

Whereas the other impression of the dress is inspired by silhouettes of traditional Han Fu crossed with Western Victorian shapes – an ode to the globalisation that brought mass production to the Chinese shores.

The dress is automated with distance sensors to create kinetic drapes and an upward dynamic, it is significant of elevation and liberation. The nature of movement is meant to elevate rather animate the drapery.

This movement is triggered by the arms, as the wearer works away with her hands.

The silky fabric and royal blues in this dress was implemented to create the feeling of grandeur. Other elements such as the train and petticoat were used to dramatise the luxury of the dress, while maintaining the almost industrial feeling of patterns.

Milestones: