Garden of Fame or Lame?

Of what used to be a well-known landmark, Jurong Hill Park which is tucked away 60 metres above sea-level and only accessible by car, has become my new favourite hideaway. In this secluded and souless park albeit beautifully maintained, all traces of the bustling city fades away and time stands still. The subtle noises of the industrial park become some sort of a therapeutic white noise,  harmonising with the symphonies of nature.

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IM2: Yayoi Kusama [The Obliteration Room]

About artwork:
Guest are invited to stick colourful dot all over a white room with white furniture.

About the artist:
Yayoi Kusama is one of the world’s quirkiest artists, known for her iconic dots, nets and pumpkins and infinity rooms. Yayoi mentions how when she was still a child; she started seeing the world through a screen of tiny dots. They covered everything she saw—the walls, ceilings, and even her own body. For 40 years she has made paintings, sculptures and photographs using dots to cover surfaces and fill rooms. Kusama calls this process “obliteration,” which means the complete destruction of every trace of something.

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Research: Jurong Hill Tower & Garden of Fame

Floating 207-metres above the bay, the iconic world’s largest Infinity Pool provides a panoramic view of the ever-expanding Singapore skyline. The sky-scraping observatory platform overlooking the cityscape could be seen as Singapore’s prime symbol of progress today, but 50 years or so ago, it was Jurong Hill Tower.

60-metres above sea level, on the top of Jurong Hill, previously known as Bukit Perupok/Peropok, stands an 18-metre tall observatory tower. The $200,00 project was commissioned in the 60s by the Jurong Town Corporations (JTC) to become a platform for foreign guests and investors to have a panoramic view of the industrial estate. Intending to gain the confidence of these investors by exhibiting Singapore’s developing industrial site, the Government hope to create more job opportunities for locals.

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Week 1: Reading on Marsha Kinder & Examples of Database/Interactive Narrative

From how Marsha Kinder describes Database Narratives, it seems very similar to the way historians retrieve and accumulate data or facts from archives and then interpret them into a narrative.  Database Narrative then would also be similar to analytical narratives, which uses the data collected to gesture at a narrative.

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Design Principles for the Ecological Crisis: Ecocentric Design

Download PDF here: History of Design Essay_Daryl Kiang Jun_U1830312F

Q4. What ideals, principles, motto and design qualities might you use to describe and define the next emergent design trend valid over the next 5 years, current to your practices? What name would you give to the design movement?

As the world population steadily increases to 8 billion, the consumeristic paradigm of which most parts of the developed world functions on becomes no longer sustainable. In addition to social problems, a self-inflicted ecological crisis threatens our human civilisation as well as the world of nature. The infinite growth potential of a consumeristic economy is incompatible with the earth which has finite raw materials and natural resources. According to Greenpeace, human consumption of natural resources has doubled over the last 30 years, prompting the United Nations to advocate for a new production model that makes optimal use of resources and energy sustainable (Iberdrola Corporativa).

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Bauhaus & Beyond: The Treachery of Images

The Treachery of Images, painted by Rene Magritte, is a painting of a pipe with the words “This is not a pipe” in French written below it. The contradiction created in this piece of work reminds me of Buddhism and their teaching on the nature of reality and its illusions. While similar in concept, they also have an introspective quality to it.

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