Skip to toolbar

CategoryResearch

Color Scheme

color_schemes

In color theory, a color scheme is the choice of colors used in design for a range of media. Color schemes are used to create style and appeal. Colors that create an aesthetic feeling when used together will commonly accompany each other in color schemes.

 

Complementary colors

The complementary colors are pairs of colors which, when combined, cancel each other out. This means that when combined, they produce a grey-scale color like white or black. When placed next to each other, they create the strongest contrast for those particular two colors.

94880882_kjiX6-L

 

Analogous colors

(also called Dominance Harmony) color scheme are groups of colors that are adjacent to each other on the color wheel, with one being the dominant color, which tends to be a primary or secondary color, and two on either side complementing, which tend to be tertiary.

The term analogous refers to the having analogy, or corresponding to something in particular. An analogous color scheme creates a rich, monochromatic look. It’s best used with either warm or cool colors, creating a look that has a certain temperature as well as proper color harmony. While this is true, the scheme also lacks contrast and is less vibrant than complementary schemes.

Copy+of+IMG_0669_adj3

 

Split-complementary

(also called Compound Harmony) color scheme is a variation of the complementary color scheme. In addition to the base color, it uses the two “Analogous” colors adjacent to its complement. Split-complementary color scheme has the same strong visual contrast as the complementary color scheme, but has less pressure.

Gilpin House 3_1

 

Triadic colors

The triadic color scheme uses three colors equally spaced around the color wheel. The easiest way to place them on the wheel is by using a triangle of equal sides. Triadic color schemes tend to be quite vibrant, even when using pale or unsaturated versions of hues, offers a higher degree of contrast while at the same time retains the color harmony. This scheme is very popular among artists because it offers strong visual contrast while retaining balance, and color richness. The triadic scheme is not as contrasting as the complementary scheme, but it is easier to accomplish balance and harmony with these colors.

deep-blue-paneled-walls

 

 

 

Tetradic colors

The tetradic (double complementary) colors scheme is the richest of all the schemes because it uses four colors arranged into two complementary color pairs. This scheme is hard to harmonize and requires a color to be dominant or subdue the colors.; if all four colors are used in equal amounts, the scheme may look unbalanced.

Rectangle

The rectangle color scheme uses four colors arranged into two complementary pairs and offers plenty of possibilities for variation. Rectangle color schemes work best when one color is dominant.

Square

The square color scheme is similar to the rectangle, but with all four colors spaced evenly around the color circle. Square color schemes works best when all colors are evenly balanced.

Fig-House-04

Color

 

 

RED – LUST

11-times-styletomatoes1-

 

Orange – hopeful

6335099074_3d895c14ee_b

 

YELLOW – FRESH

tumblr_nlvpz742L61qbsrwpo1_500

 

Yellow Green – relaxed
tumblr_mh2fapO8741r60qnbo1_1280

 

Turquoise – Scary

11888492223_e693eb1cb3_b

 

 

Violet – Infatuated

tumblr_m6xhxjQHkQ1rska6xo1_540

 

 

Blue – lonely

The-Horse-by-Goff-Kitsawad

Principles of Design

Principles of Design

The principles of design describe the ways that artists use the elements of art in a work of art.

Balance

Balance is the distribution of the visual weight of objects, colors, texture, and space. If the design was a scale, these elements should be balanced to make a design feel stable.  Principles-01

In symmetrical balance, the elements used on one side of the design are similar to those on the other side;

Principles-02-600x300

In asymmetrical balance, the sides are different but still look balanced.

screen-shot-2013-03-25-at-10-46-07

In radial balance, the elements are arranged around a central point and may be similar.

 

 

Emphasis

Emphasis is the part of the design that catches the viewer’s attention. Usually the artist will make one area stand out by contrasting it with other areas. The area could be different in size, color, texture, shape, etc.

Principles-052-emphasis

 

 

Movement

Movement is the path the viewer’s eye takes through the work of art, often to focal areas. Such movement can be directed along lines, edges, shape, and color within the work of art.

Principles-06

Go Media New Document

Principles-03

 

Pattern

Pattern is the repeating of an object or symbol all over the work of art.

013112-015635AM_0d5433c79f478df08aa032eb407fdc0382791c1d_m

 

 

Repetition

Repetition works with pattern to make the work of art seem active. The repetition of elements of design creates unity within the work of art.

rep1

 

 

Proportion

Proportion is the feeling of unity created when all parts (sizes, amounts, or number) relate well with each other. When drawing the human figure, proportion can refer to the size of the head compared to the rest of the body.

Principles-07-600x300

 

 

Rhythm

Rhythm is created when one or more elements of design are used repeatedly to create a feeling of organized movement. Rhythm creates a mood like music or dancing. To keep rhythm exciting and active, variety is essential.

1962_04

 

 

Variety

Variety is the use of several elements of design to hold the viewer’s attention and to guide the viewer’s eye through and around the work of art.

variety1

 

 

Unity

Unity is the feeling of harmony between all parts of the work of art, which creates a sense of completeness.

principles-of-design-part-i-gestalt-lawsunity-and-harmony-4-728 principles_of_design_harmony_by_akumadorobo-d4ifpx4

Nonsensical

Having no meaning; making no sense.

Abstract art

Abstract Art – Jackson Pollock