I Light Critique

I managed to catch a few of the interactive works when I went for I Light. The first being ‘Facey Thing’ by Uji Studios which was a sort of satirical take on the selfie culture amongst the masses in this day and age.

Fig 1. Facey Thing by Uji Studios, 2019, I Light, Singapore.
pictures screenshot from video taken by: En Cui

When you first encounter it, ‘Facey Thing’ is a bright huge screen that is twice the height of an ordinary human.

Diagram 1, mock up of Facey Thing

So the set up is simple, consisting of a screen which is hooked up to a single camera that captures the passerbys that are oving in front of the work. The code that runs this work is set to capture the faces of the people who are standing in front of it.

Fig 2. Facey Thing by Uji Studios, 2019, I Light, Singapore.
pictures screenshot from video taken by: En Cui

Fig 3. Facey Thing by Uji Studios, 2019, I Light, Singapore.
pictures screenshot from video taken by: En Cui

When your face is recognised by the screen it is boxed up as seen in fig 2 above and would later evolve to fig 3. In Fig 3, the faces of the passerbys are blown up and dragged upward almost as though painting the canvas with their face. So in this case the images on the screen are temporarily changed by the people who interact with it, if not it is no more then an ordinary close circuit video recording. It warps the initial intention of Selfies to be one that portray one self as ‘glam’ to being very ‘unglam’ instead by warping the passerby’s faces. 

Fig 4. Facey Thing by Uji Studios, 2019, I Light, Singapore.
pictures screenshot from video taken by: En Cui

The people that decided to interact it were waving their hands of moving about oddly to try and get their face recognised by the system.

Subsequently I caught “Shades of Temporality” by SWEATSHOPPE – Blake Shaw and Bruno Levy.

Fig 5. Shades of Temporality by SweatShoppe, 2019, I Light Singapore
Text: 你好 Lei <3
Written by: En Cui, Christine and Elizabeth

This work has two elements to it, the first being the visualiser projecting the ‘painted image’ on to the wall, and the second being the paint rollers.

Diagram 2, Mock up of the painting brushes used in Shades of Temporarity

Diagram 3, Mock up of the set up of Shades of Temporarity

When the button in diagram 2 is pressed the paint brush head up turns green. this is then sensed by the camera and the visualiser will send an out put of light that will corespond to the area where the paint brush touched, projecting a loop of graphical illustrations of Singapore.

In this case the audience are encouraged to make temporary graffity designs on the wall, hence creating art. the audience is given the ability to write what ever they want to express themselves in anyway they see fit.

Mark Making Research

Mark making is the term used to define when a line or various lines are put together to form textures and patterns on any surface.

Mark Making is present in our everyday lives, starting with the most obvious being writing with a pen or pencil. Each style of writing is different based on how a person manipulates their pen or pencil, hence some are more curvaceous whereas some are more linear. Hence some people may find some handwriting more pleasing to read then others.

These lines have certain qualities that ‘persuade’ us to feel in a certain way.

An example of which can be found in Wassily Kandinsky’s “Composition VII”

Source taken from: http://www.theartstory.org/artist-kandinsky-wassily-artworks.htm#pnt_4

Wassily Kandinsky is well known for his interpretations of various music pieces. “Composition VII” makes use of contrasting lines that clash and overlap each other. The various directions, and individual shapes each lines takes seem to compete with the others, which creates chaos and/or confusion.

In the case of paintings, brushes have the ability to shape a line into various shapes. However we also make tools with various tips to create a unique stroke.

Creating your tools, or having tools with tips of various shapes and sizes can in various patterns despite being used in a similar manner.

source from: https://es.pinterest.com/pin/850687817084708293/

As seen by the above, the rougher material results in a spindly, almost scratchy effect. When used in sharp swift movements the lines are thinner,  that could resemble irritation or confusion. The second tool creates rounder lines, that seem more uniform than the first. The last imitates a dry brush resulting in segregated segments of ink within each stroke.

Colour too plays a part in mark marking, creating weight and shadows, which gives emphasis to certain part of the image.

source from: https://es.pinterest.com/pin/151363237451900564/

Darker segments tend to be more eye catching, as it creates weight to the image. However, negative spaces within dark contrasting areas act as an accent, which draws attention beyond the dark spaces, like a pathway to other parts of the painting.